[Reading] ➷ How to Wake Up: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide to Navigating Joy and Sorrow By Toni Bernhard – Fanfaremedia.co.uk

How to Wake Up: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide to Navigating Joy and Sorrow summary How to Wake Up: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide to Navigating Joy and Sorrow, series How to Wake Up: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide to Navigating Joy and Sorrow, book How to Wake Up: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide to Navigating Joy and Sorrow, pdf How to Wake Up: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide to Navigating Joy and Sorrow, How to Wake Up: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide to Navigating Joy and Sorrow fa5de1f53f Intimately And Without Jargon, How To Wake Up A Buddhist Inspired Guide To Navigating Joy And Sorrow Describes The Path To Peace Amid All Of Life S Ups And Downs Using Step By Step Instructions, The Author Illustrates How To Be Fully Present In The Moment Without Clinging To Joy Or Resisting Sorrow This Opens The Door To A Kind Of Wellness That Goes Beyond Circumstances Actively Engaging Life As It Is In This Fashion Holds The Potential For Awakening To A Peace And Well Being That Are Not Dependent On Whether A Particular Experience Is Joyful Or Sorrowful This Is A Practical Book, Containing Dozens Of Exercises And Practices, All Of Which Are Illustrated With Easy To Relate To Personal Stories From The Author S Experience


10 thoughts on “How to Wake Up: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide to Navigating Joy and Sorrow

  1. says:

    Being an almost 36 year bone cancer survivor who s crutches are permanent, I was immediately drawn to Toni s first book, How to Be Sick A Buddhist Inspired Guide for the Chronically Ill and Their Caregivers As I suspected I might, I enjoyed it very much I was delighted to discover she was working on this book and I pre ordered it as soon as I could.While I didn t grow up with Buddhist principles, I am coming to appreciate that there is a lot of wisdom to be found and borrowed there, especiall Being an almost 36 year bone cancer survivor who s crutches are permanent, I was immediately drawn to Toni s first book, How to Be Sick A Buddhist Inspired Guide for the Chronically Ill and Their Caregivers As I suspected I might, I enjoyed it very much I was delighted to discover she was working on this book and I pre ordered it as soon as I could.While I didn t grow up with Buddhist principles, I am coming to appreciate that there is a lot of wisdom to be found and borrowed there, especially with the guidance of a gentle author like Toni I find her voice to be wise, compassionate and accessible From her personal examples sprinkled throughout both of her books, it feels to me like she is walking beside her readers as a fellow traveler, all while openly and willingly sharing her experience, strength and hope.Yes, this book is one to be savored and I am very much enjoying taking in her wisdom slowly, a chapter at a time I am deeply grateful for her beautiful writing voice


  2. says:

    I didn t think much of this book when I started reading it I ve read other books about Buddhism and related topics that I ve foundinspiring, illuminating, and intellectually challenging in a good way TheI read, though, theI noticed that the author was doing exactly what she set out to do provide the reader with practical advice on dealing with the suffering dissatisfactions annoyances of daily life As a long time Buddhist and someone with a chronic illness she was diagno I didn t think much of this book when I started reading it I ve read other books about Buddhism and related topics that I ve foundinspiring, illuminating, and intellectually challenging in a good way TheI read, though, theI noticed that the author was doing exactly what she set out to do provide the reader with practical advice on dealing with the suffering dissatisfactions annoyances of daily life As a long time Buddhist and someone with a chronic illness she was diagnosed with a viral infection in 2001 from which she has not recovered , Toni Bernhard has had many years of practice in finding equanimity under difficult circumstances.This is not a book geared to those who are physically unwell Bernhard has already written that book , but counsel for anyone who wants to be happier and is ready to consider that the solution is internal, that we have the capacity to relieve the emotional discomfort that comes along with being human Along the way, How to Wake Up A Buddhist Inspired Guide to Navigating Joy and Sorrow does a creditable job of explaining Buddhism s key principles Bernhard accomplishes this not in an academic or theoretical way, but with pragmatic examples and constructive language that require no prior knowledge of Buddhism I finished How to Wake Up with a greater appreciation not only for Toni Bernhard s approach, but for her compassionate and friendly voice


  3. says:

    If Goodreads offered us the ability to rate a book 7 stars, I would use it for this book More than anything I ve ever read, I believe this book has the ability to change lives for the better Pretty sure it wouldn t matter whether you re an atheist, Buddhist, devout Christian or follower of some other religion regardless, I believe this book contains lots of practical wisdom for helping you live askillful, mentally healthy life Check it out.Also, I want to mention that I d never have pi If Goodreads offered us the ability to rate a book 7 stars, I would use it for this book More than anything I ve ever read, I believe this book has the ability to change lives for the better Pretty sure it wouldn t matter whether you re an atheist, Buddhist, devout Christian or follower of some other religion regardless, I believe this book contains lots of practical wisdom for helping you live askillful, mentally healthy life Check it out.Also, I want to mention that I d never have picked up this book on my own I m almost positive it would ve struck me as way too touchy feely New Agey trite I m taking a 6 week class on meditation practice and this book was assigned by our teacher to whom I ll be eternally grateful.I also have it on good authority that people have found her 1st book, How to Be Sick, super helpful both for its intended audience those living with chronic illness and their caregivers and for others.Thank you, Toni Bernhard May you be AWAP


  4. says:

    _How to Wake Up_ lacks the vitality of Bernhard s first book, _How to Be Sick_, which is becoming a deserved touchstone in Buddhist books This volume isof an introduction to mindfulness albeit one of the most direct and practical primers on the subject that I have read.Toni Bernhard was a long time professor and dean at UC Davis s law school before becoming irredeemably sick with a mystery disease that has her bedridden for most of the day She was a practicing Buddhist at the time her _How to Wake Up_ lacks the vitality of Bernhard s first book, _How to Be Sick_, which is becoming a deserved touchstone in Buddhist books This volume isof an introduction to mindfulness albeit one of the most direct and practical primers on the subject that I have read.Toni Bernhard was a long time professor and dean at UC Davis s law school before becoming irredeemably sick with a mystery disease that has her bedridden for most of the day She was a practicing Buddhist at the time her illness set in, and almost lost her faith though faith isn t quite the right word here before realizing the techniques she had learned could help with her grief and disappointment Her first book passed on those techniques to others dealing with chronic illnesses She then started writing for Psychology Today, and those essays became the seeds o many of the chapters in this book, she says.The book suffers from some of the traditional problems of this genre of writing What bothered me most although, admittedly, it was a mostly minor annoyance was that Bernhard tended to elevate the Buddha to something of an all seeing deity, rather than a man who had learned a few practices, passed those on, and had them develop over the years into a body of practical wisdom.Books on Buddhism can also get bogged down in classifications it s inherent, since that bod of practical wisdom was built on organizing and defining the various problems with human thought and the states to which the mind could aspire If you get into the literature, there s an almost endless list of often metaphorically named categories the three jewels, the Four Noble Truths, the Twelve Insights, and on and on There s an obvious pedagogical intent in these groupings, and I can imagine as an obnoxious, nerdy high school student I would have loved to memorize these Not so much any.Bernhard, while acknowledging the categories, and even structuring her book around them, has a very light touch with the taxonomy Sometimes I felt like I was reading a textbook, but this was pretty rare.The first part of the book is built around not The Four Noble Truths, as one might expect, but what she calls the Three Marks of existence That nothing is permanent, that we have no bounded sense of self, and that everyone will encounter suffering She spends extra time on this last issue, noting that there are different kinds of suffering The most important are the sufferings we impose on ourselves though we feel that it is imposed by forces the thirst for pleasant experiences to las forever, unpleasant experiences to end, and for the story of ourselves to be in our control This thirst is unquenchable and powerful we feel that if only these certain conditions were met, we would finally find peace and contentment.Bernhard notes that there are five habits of mind that prevent us from dealing with these thirsts skillfully what has come to be called the Five Hindrances desire for pleasure, anger, laziness, worry, and doubt.The second section deals with mindfulness And the third deals with developing an open heart through four practices kindness, compassion, appreciative joy, and equanimity.What really sets the book apart, though, I think, is Bernhard s training as a lawyer there s a law school feel to the book that, surprisingly, makes it especially effective As someone who only watches law and law school from afar, it seems to me that there s a tendency in legal thinking to come up with standardized maneuvers or responses Person A argues this, and so the reasonable response to that argument is K There s a lot of this kind of thinking in Bernhard s book, which is extremely helpful Too often books on Buddhism talk about its practicality but don t really show it I m looking at you Chogyam Trungpa Bernhard is very keen on giving practical advice, so much so that this almost becomes a how to book Best of all, the practices are given right when she discusses the issues, and not saved for some other chapter.So, how do we live skillfully with impermanence Treat interruptions as a normal part of the day How do we deal with our changing selves By not clinging to any one How do we deal with unquenchable suffering Recognize that we are unsatisfied, label it, try to figure out why, and then let it go How do we deal with the five hindrances The same way How do we becomemindful which will, in turn, help us recognize when we are suffering Cut back on multi tasking, perform tasksslowly, describe events concretely, use a cue to become mindful like a bell , write poems Also, one could try focusing on a specific thing and investigating all the sensory responses to it or start by paying attention to the breath and then slowly noticing the rest of the world around us Another way is to sit quietly and slowly scan the body, noticing where we might be tight or hurting or soft but not judging Just noticing.Bernahrd also has techniques for developing an open heart eel kindness towards strangers as we walk by them, or compassion, or joy in their joy, Extend this practice to others in our life, including those about whom we feel neutral, those whom we love, and, eventually, those whom we dislike.To practice equanimity with skill, it helps to remember the law of impermanence Something may be wonderful or horrible, and we may want it to last or end, but if we remember that it will pass, we can enjoy it for being there at all or know it will not go on forever.Throughout the book Bernhard uses the word skillfully, which makes sense in terms of her practice oriented approach, but also serves as a reminder of two things 1 we will sometimes maybe often fail, and there is no reason to get angry at ourselves We should be compassionate with ourselves Everyone fails at some time The next moment then gives as a chance to try again 2 we will get better with practice, even though we may never be perfect.She even has a little practice built around this last point There s only one Beatles, a friend told her, but lots of people still make music Similarly, we can all try to be better at these practices, even if we are not perfect Indeed, the whole point is to get comfortable with our own imperfections


  5. says:

    Wonderfully insightfulAnyone who ever has any distress, challenges, discomfort, pain, illness, etc would be well served in reading this book Key is how we relate and work with what comes up rather than pushing away what we don t want or clinging to what we do.


  6. says:

    How To Wake Up, by Toni Bernhard is an easy to read and compelling introduction to Buddhist thought and practice As I have been learning recently about Buddhism, none of the basic ideas were new to me, and yet I would encourage even people who are not new to Buddhism to read it, as well as those who are Toni gives fresh perspectives and personal examples which are thought provoking and useful There are beautiful quotations at the start of each chapter, which I very much enjoyed, as well as pa How To Wake Up, by Toni Bernhard is an easy to read and compelling introduction to Buddhist thought and practice As I have been learning recently about Buddhism, none of the basic ideas were new to me, and yet I would encourage even people who are not new to Buddhism to read it, as well as those who are Toni gives fresh perspectives and personal examples which are thought provoking and useful There are beautiful quotations at the start of each chapter, which I very much enjoyed, as well as passages that I know I will want to refer to when I am struggling with particular issues With her clear and comforting style, I think many will find this book becomes a friendly guide to keep close and refer to many times.A book for anyone who wants to feelat ease with life and the way things are


  7. says:

    I ve read a number of books along these lines What sets this one apart is the simplicity, clarity and above all, the humility of the author s style At no time does she come across as a guru instructing her disciples from a lofty height of enlightenment Rather she allows us to see her own struggles, vulnerabilities and failures during her many years as a practitioner The warmth and intimacy in which she shares with her reader the insights and wisdom she s learned along the way gives us the im I ve read a number of books along these lines What sets this one apart is the simplicity, clarity and above all, the humility of the author s style At no time does she come across as a guru instructing her disciples from a lofty height of enlightenment Rather she allows us to see her own struggles, vulnerabilities and failures during her many years as a practitioner The warmth and intimacy in which she shares with her reader the insights and wisdom she s learned along the way gives us the impression of having a conversation with a trusted friend I d recommend this book highly to anyone seeking greater peace, compassion and understanding in their lives


  8. says:

    A brilliant writer does it again A journey toward enlightenmentToni s stories are relevant for overcoming obstacles to our journey in life.I was unsure how she could ever add to her brilliant book How to Be Sick, but she has She is a truly gifted writer.Toni relates Buddha s terms and teachings in a way that is easy to understand This is especially helpful for a non Buddhist person, such as myself She teaches us how not to become fixed in our person or our way of thinking I think when we A brilliant writer does it again A journey toward enlightenmentToni s stories are relevant for overcoming obstacles to our journey in life.I was unsure how she could ever add to her brilliant book How to Be Sick, but she has She is a truly gifted writer.Toni relates Buddha s terms and teachings in a way that is easy to understand This is especially helpful for a non Buddhist person, such as myself She teaches us how not to become fixed in our person or our way of thinking I think when we receive this information without judgment we can see that every day, every moment, offers opportunity for enlightenment.As an educator, I easily see Toni s own experiences as teacher professor by the way each chapter builds on the previous This is important to readers, such as me, who are not familiar with many of the terms Regardless of how we resist change, change is inevitable as is suffering, peace, and desire We are challenged to live in the present and acknowledge challenges for what they are and appreciate joy If I had to pick only one Buddhist teaching that I apply to myself, it would be the story telling of Dukka Of course, I have , but I will not reveal what s in the book I will leave that to you We must embrace pain and burn it as fuel for our journey Kenji Miyazawa One of my favorite quotes in the book


  9. says:

    Beautifully written, it is one of the clearest, easiest to understand, practical book on Buddhism It s suitable for newbies to Buddhism and yet has something too forexperienced practitioners Bernhard explains that we can awaken to peace and well being by recognizing our resistance to impermanence or change, no fixed self and suffering or dissatisfaction is what causes dukkha, and by cultivating wisdom, mindfulness, compassion, kindness and appreciative joy Overall a wonderful book and n Beautifully written, it is one of the clearest, easiest to understand, practical book on Buddhism It s suitable for newbies to Buddhism and yet has something too forexperienced practitioners Bernhard explains that we can awaken to peace and well being by recognizing our resistance to impermanence or change, no fixed self and suffering or dissatisfaction is what causes dukkha, and by cultivating wisdom, mindfulness, compassion, kindness and appreciative joy Overall a wonderful book and now one of my favourites


  10. says:

    A mind changer Calming and insightful.


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